OVERSEAS STUDENTS

All you need to know about healthcare at 28 Beaumont Street

At 28 Beaumont Street we welcome registration for students who are visiting from overseas. We can advise students on their entitlements to NHS health care, as this depends upon both their nationality and length of time in the UK. We can also provide high quality privately funded ongoing health care to those students who are not entitled to NHS treatment.

Immediately necessary (emergency treatment) is free for all people in the UK irrespective of nationality or residency.

This page outlines the important information which overseas students need to know about using 28 Beaumont Street’s healthcare services, and also about UK healthcare in general.

The doctors at 28 Beaumont Street are General Practitioners (GPs). A GP is an experienced physician who has trained both in hospitals and in the community.

A GP is not limited to a specific medical specialty but covers a variety of medical problems in patients of all ages. GPs diagnose and treat the vast majority of illnesses and ailments, and provide patients with general health advice.

GPs are similar to some extent to family doctors or Primary Health Care Physicians. It takes about 10 years to train to be a GP in the UK. GPs are bound by strict confidentiality rules.

In the UK, unless you are in an emergency situation, a GP is the first physician you need to consult if you need to have access to specialist healthcare advice. GPs are entitled to make medical referrals on your behalf to both NHS and private medical specialist (see below “How do I see a specialist”).

Please ensure you bring enough of your repeat medications as it can take some time to continue your prescription. Our prescribing is in line with current CCG prescribing, and may not include some drugs prescribed overseas. Therefore we may switch your medication to the nearest appropriate drug -taking into account cost and efficacy.

 

Dealing With Emergencies

For information about emergencies please see our Emergencies Section

 

How do I make an appointment?

See our appointments section for information on booking a time to see one of our doctors or nurses.

 

How do I register for free NHS care?

Full information on registering for NHS care as an overseas visitor can be found in our patient info section.

However, it’s worth noting that many countries, including the USA, do not have a reciprocal healthcare arrangement with the UK. Students from these countries are very welcome to see our doctors but will have to pay a private consultation fee.

All overseas students are advised to check their eligibility for NHS treatment before they travel and take out appropriate health insurance to cover any costs.

 

How do I see a specialist?

All people who are resident in the UK are eligible for NHS care, and this includes students who are studying here for longer than 6 months from the time of applying for registration. Full information on registering for NHS care as an overseas visitor can be found in our new patient section.

Students from the European Union who are in the UK for the purposes of short study courses will be eligible for NHS care because of reciprocal healthcare arrangements with the UK. You will need to bring your EHIC card to your consultations to qualify for NHS funded treatment.

However, all other countries, including the USA, do not have a full reciprocal healthcare arrangement with the UK. Students from these countries are very welcome to see our doctors but will be requested to pay a private consultation fee.

All overseas students are advised to check their eligibility for NHS treatment before they travel and take out appropriate health insurance to cover any costs.

 

How do I find out your latest charges and fees?

For details of our latest fees and charges for non-NHS patients, please phone the practice on 01865 311811.

We have a close relationship with a number of private colleges. We offer DISCOUNTED FEES to students on the following courses and programmes:

  • Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS)
  • Stanford University Program in Oxford
  • University of Massachusetts (UMASS)
  • Washington International Studies Council (WISC)

To receive the discount, please bring proof you are on one of these courses when you attend your appointment.

 

Minor Illnesses and common ailments

Colds, minor sore throats, diarrhoea and flu-like illnesses can usually be managed at your hostel or by your host family. Please let someone who is responsible for your wellbeing as a student know as soon as possible if you feel unwell. Remember you can seek medical advice by telephone from the practice at 28 Beaumont Street if you are registered with us. .

The NHS Direct website contains information about managing minor illnesses and ailments at home. You can ring NHS Direct at any time for advice on 0845 4647.

 

Cycling safely in Oxford

If you do cycle, please wear a strong cycle helmet and remember to ride on the left side of the road.

In the UK, cyclists are not permitted to ride on the pavement (sidewalk) and are required to stop at all red traffic lights (there is no equivalent to the ‘turn right on red’ rule).

You must give way to pedestrians on zebra crossings and use cycle lights after dark. If you cycle at night without lights you may be stopped by the police and charged an on-the-spot fine.

The Highway Code contains all the rules and regulations that cyclists need to know for the UK’s roads. More information can be found here.

 

Further information

The Royal College of General Practitioners has produced a useful detailed guide for patients about the NHS services on offer at GP Surgeries and how to access them.  You can download the guide here.